Archive for the ‘History of Neckwear’ Category

The history of neckwear – Where did your tie come from?

Tuesday, May 18th, 2010

You may have purchased your latest tie at a local retail outlet, men’s store, or from a website. You can even see the new trends of ties from famous fashion designers, such as Marc Jacobs. Regardless of how and where you purchased your tie, I bet you didn’t know it dates back to the Third Century B.C. That’s right, that piece of silk you knotted around your neck this morning is derived from centuries of neckwear use, evolving over time to what we use today. As you can see in the painting below, neckwear or knotted scarfs were used by Chinese terra-cotta warriors around 200 B.C.

In 1974, an army of 7,500 terra-cotta warriors were unearthed in China by local farmers. Each of the warriors had a knotted scarf around their neck, the first known use of neckwear. It was determined that this was the tomb of the first emperor of China, Ch’in Shi Huang-ti. Below is a photo of one of the terra-cotta warriors. It is thought that in early times, this form of neckwear was used primarily for protection from the sun and weather elements.

So next time you tie on your favorite tie, know that it’s not just another tie from China, but that it actually came from China’s rich history. For more information on the Terra-Cotta Warriors, please visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terracotta_Army.

Famous Men and their Influence on Ties – Fred Astaire

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

There is no doubt that Fred Astaire (May 10, 1899 – June 22, 1987) is one of the most enduring personalities to affect the way we dress today. With a career spanning 76 years and 31 musical films, he exhibited his dancing, singing and acting skills on stage and the silver screen. Fred Astaire and his flawless silhouette was often features on the cover of popular magazines wearing some of the finest suits, ties, and top hats.

Fred was well known for his fine London-tailored suits. But he had a tendency to wear light colored ties, and often pairing stripes and dots. His nonchalant attitude was extremely likable, conveying a sense of elegance and graceful living.

Fred was considered a fashion icon and continues to influence men’s fashion today. He often wore old ties as belts, which may catch on at some point. His legacy may live on, but may be forgotten at some point as nobody as played Fred Astaire in a current film or musical. He always refused permission for such portrayals, saying, “However much they offer me – and offers come in all the time – I shall not sell.” Astaire’s will included a clause requesting that no such portrayal ever take place; he commented, “It is there because I have no particular desire to have my life misinterpreted, which it would be.” You don’t see that too often these days! May his elegance, couth, fashion, and legacy live on.

Wear a dotted tie or a simple striped – black and white tie in honor of a great man.

The Windsor Knot – The History and How To Tie it.

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010

Did you know there are over 100 ways to tie your necktie? I would like to share with you my “GO TO” knot, the Windsor! In the 1930’s American fashion was dictated by two polarizing figures. The famous actor Fred Astaire and the Duke of Windsor (formally Edward VIII) influenced men’s neckwear decisions, still popular today.

The Duke of Windsor and his Grandfather King Edward VII both opted to tie their knots in a manner that formed a wide triangular knot. When the Duke of Windsor visited the Unites States in the 1930’s, his fashion sense was quickly adopted, as it was considered more comfortable and relaxed. Needless to say, the Windsor knot and it’s variations are still used every day. Here is a picture of The Duke of Windsor:

Duke of Windsor

The Duke of Windsor featured in Vogue Magazine

The Windsor knot is best worn with a wide collar or spread collar. When tied properly, the knot is tight, and does not slip away from the collar during wear. Compared to other knots, it is very comfortable to wear, as the knot itself will hold the tie firmly in place while still keeping space between the collar and neck.
The knot is symmetrical, well balanced and self-releasing. It is a large knot, which amply displays the fabric and design of the tie when wearing a closed jacket or coat. Here is a look at a completed Windsor knot, it is up to you if you would like to dimple, double dimple, or go flat.

Completed Windsor KnotHere is a simple 7 step diagram to help you tie your windsor knot…it’s actually pretty simple. A note on position, when getting started, the shorter the narrow end is around your neck, the longer the tie will be when finished.

What does your tie say about you?

Monday, May 10th, 2010

“As rich in meaning and as expressive as a poem, a tie gives a man his own language”. Stated by Gary Cooper in 1933.

This is a bold, yet very true statement. Your tie says more about you than you may have previously imagined.

What does your tie say about you?

While the picture of Gary Cooper is in black and white, the elegance and professional attire are the first things you notice. Regardless of the tie’s color, it is worn properly, paired nicely with a pocket square, and is in perfect position. You can tell, Gary Cooper was a man of distinction, class, and a true gentleman.

While Gary Cooper was before my time, he influenced many through his acting and off screen lifestyle.  Being fashion forward doesn’t take much, except for concerted thought and follow through.

Wear your Anchor Ties with confidence, knowing it will never get in your way or sway out of place, others WILL notice just how good you look!